Mother Kicked Out of 4-H Club Meeting for Breastfeeding Toddler, Told to “Find a Different Group”

April 15, 2021 at 8:41 pm




Government-run agriculture organization breaks law by publicly humiliating breastfeeding mother and then forcing her to leave

Tiffany Rounds breastfeeding in her car after being asked to leave 4-H meeting





A Maryland woman has taken to social media to help her educate a government-run organization about the law when it comes to breastfeeding in public.

Tiffany Rounds was quietly breastfeeding her baby at her first 4-H club meeting, when the leader of the youth organization stopped in the middle of her speech to publicly humiliate her.

In front of everyone, she asked her to cover up or move elsewhere, and informed her that 4H had a policy against people “exposing themselves.”

“This turned all attention to me and my nursing, when I was being of no disruption prior to her announcing I was feeding,” Rounds said.

“I refused to turn my back in shame. Because of the attention SHE drew to me, I was now an example to every child there watching.”

Rounds stood her ground for several minutes, but after several attempts to explain her legal right to feed her child in public without a single adult, other than her husband, standing up for her, she gave up and went to her car to cry and nurse her baby to sleep.

Embarrassed, violated, and shamed,” she wrote.

Now Rounds wants everyone to know that the way she was treated was not only inappropriate and unprofessional, it’s illegal.

Mothers have a legal right to breastfeed in public in all 50 states, and it is illegal to ask them to “cover up” or hide in a “less public” space.

The 4-H Club’s mission statement is to help youth develop to their fullest potential with a focus on strengthening their “heads, hearts, hands and health.”

Similar to Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, 4-H is a government-chartered organization, overseen by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

In its early days, the goal was to encourage rural youth to contribute to advancements in agriculture, although today, it has a broader scope, fostering citizenship, leadership and life skills in urban and suburban children, as well.

Hoping the violation of the law was just an accident by one ill-informed 4-H leader, Rounds went to other 4-H leaders at her county and state level and was met with more ignorance.

Another group leader in her county said they “weren’t sure would handle it,” as they have teenage boys who attend those meetings.

Rounds said the unidentified county leader told her it “might be best for her to join a different group” that might be a “better fit.”

“This is sexist and misogynistic rhetoric,” Rounds wrote. “Breastfeeding is the standard in infant nutrition, and no mother should ever be made to feel ashamed and embarrassed for providing her child with nourishment and comfort.

State-level representatives of 4-H said they’d “have to investigate” before they could do anything to help.

“For the sake of a program that has supported children for decades I am hoping to resolve this issue before filing a report with the Attorney General,” Rounds said.

In the meantime, she is asking the public to contact:

Garrett County Extension Office at wguard@umd.edu or

(301) 334-6960

The Maryland State 4H Office at cporterf@umd.edu or
(301) 314-9070