Agriculture Ruined Our Relationship with the Earth, Forest Gardening Can Fix It

April 4, 2018 at 4:31 pm




Agriculture made us enemies of the Earth. Live Free or Die star Tony Troia explains how forest gardening can turn us back into best friends.

Tony and Amelia eating in their forest garden on their National Geographic reality TV show “Live Free or Die

Grow a 100-Year-Old Food Forest in Your Backyard in Just 10 Years

March 8, 2018 at 5:05 am




Engineer develops method for growing mature, dense food forests in just 10 years

Most of the world we live in today was once forest, our natural habitat for millions of years.

One-Acre Permaculture Garden Feeds 50 Families

February 24, 2018 at 2:36 pm




One-acre garden provides fruit, veggies and eggs for 50 families with very little labor

More and more people are learning growing food doesn’t have to be hard work. When you work with nature instead of against it, it does much of the work for you.

Here’s What Happens When You Add Earthworms to Your Garden

January 30, 2018 at 5:16 pm





Earthworms build topsoil from scratch and increase food production up to 75 percent, meta-analysis finds


In order to “meet the challenge of feeding a growing world population,” soil scientists from the Netherlands have published a report on what they believe is one the most important factors effecting crop production — earthworms.

The No-Till Gardening Revolution: Why Farmers are Putting Down Their Plows

January 27, 2018 at 2:35 am




After thousands of years of turning the soil upside-down, farmers are finally realizing they’re killing the microorganisms that keep soil alive… Faced with losing the farm, more and more are converting to the ancient “n0-till” methods of permaculture

In the no-till gardening method seedlings are planted into tiny holes drilled with as little disturbance to the soil as possible. Credit: www.charlesdowding.co.uk

To “till” soil means to dig it up, stir it, or turn it over. Whether it’s done with a shovel, a hoe, a pick or a plow, the goal is to turn over the upper layer of the soil, bringing fresh nutrients to the surface, while burying weeds.

Tilling has been the hallmark of agriculture, since its inception, with the plow being the most intensive tool to this end.

But 10,000 years after we started doing it, humans are finally starting to question whether digging up the Earth is the smartest way to make her produce for us.

Why It’s Time to Un-Potty-Train Ourselves

January 14, 2018 at 2:43 pm

Toilets waste massive amounts of water and essential nutrients that could be used in place of chemical fertilzers




 

An article in I F**king Love Science encourages people to pee in their showers to save water and the planet “just a little bit.”

They calculate the average American uses around 4000 gallons of water flushing pee down the toilet per year, peeing an average of 7 times per day.

We’re in the Middle of Earth’s 6th Mass Extinction Event, Scientists Warn

January 8, 2018 at 5:48 pm




More than half of all animal species have disappeared in the last 50 years… Scientists warn humans could be next if we don’t make major changes


Earth’s 5th mass extinction was 65 million years ago, when the dinosaurs and countless other species disappeared. Humans could go out with the 6th, if they don’t make some major changes quick… but no one seems to care or even notice that it’s happening.

“Earth’s sixth mass extinction event is underway,” the headlines of dozens of major newspapers warned last summer.

Permaculture Garden Produces 7000 Pounds of Organic Food Per Year on a Tenth of an Acre

December 23, 2017 at 10:11 pm




Family grows 7000 pounds of organic food per year on a tenth of an acre, supplying 90 percent of their vegetarian diet… They spend less than $2 per day per person on other kitchen staples and make over $20,000 a year selling excess produce

Fifteen minutes from downtown Los Angeles, just 100 feet away from a major freeway, a small city lot was transformed into a mini paradise.

The 30 Most Valuable Plants for Urban and Suburban Gardens

December 13, 2017 at 4:47 pm




In a recent post, I wrote about why permaculture is humanity’s last hope for long-term survival. We could go back to hunting and gathering, but there isn’t much wild food left to hunt or gather, thanks to the global destruction caused by agriculture.

Permaculture is not only sustainable, it’s regenerative, says author of the world’s best selling permaculture book Gaia’s Garden: A Guide to Home-Scale Permaculture, 2nd Edition Toby Hemenway. It regenerates the soil, plant life, wild animals and eventually creates rich, complex, bio-diverse forest ecosystems, which produce tons of free, nutrient-dense foods.

Why Permaculture is the Future of Food, if There is a Future of Food

December 11, 2017 at 2:50 am




Permaculture is not only sustainable, it’s regenerative, and can heal the damage caused by conventional agriculture.

Bullock’s Permaculture Homestead on Orcas Island

When someone claimed to have a “sustainable” farm, the late biologist and permaculture professor Toby Hemenway liked to ask them how long their farm had been around?

“500 years? 5000? A million?”

Because hardly anyone could answer more than a hundred, Hemenway started to realize most of us have no idea what “sustainable” means.

In the video below, he explains why there is no such thing as sustainable agriculture and why permaculture has to be the future of food if there’s going to be a future for humans at all.